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dignity in our hands. blood springs forward as of this moment, now, now, now! >> abraham lincoln has asked to us work with him to accomplish the death of slavery. >> no one's ever been loved so much by the people. don't waste that power. >> this fight is for the united states of america. >> we choose to be born or are we fitted into the times we're born into? >>> welcome back to a special holiday edition of "morning joe." >> you're special. >> you should feel very special. >> enjoying your holidays? >> yeah, it great, all that togetherness. thank you for spending part of your morning with us. we're talking lincoln. >> wish the neighbors would leave already. >> are they over there still? >> yeah, they came over. >> do you know their names yet? >> not yet. i never met them. they're from -- hey neighbor. we let them in but -- >> hey, how are you, it's good to see you. then it's like i don't know your name. >> i'm going to buy them all tickets to my favorite movie of the year "lincoln," going to hand it to them on line, get them to unlock it. >> that's a good idea. >> this is a heck of a coinc
of abraham lincoln: a novel." professor carter, they are to premise in here that i want to get to that are historically inaccurate. number one, abraham lincoln survived the assassination of him, and abraham lincoln is impeached. where did you come up with this? >> i start by making clear that in spite of the title, i am a lincoln fan. this is not an argument on behalf of lincoln's impeachment. it's not a brief -- it's just a novel and for me as a fan and someone interested in history, what if lincoln had survived and what if, in my telling as political enemies, he had many including in his own party which would tend to forget, political enemies as late as 1865 were looking for way to get them out of the way. what if you tried to do it the impeachment process. >> but again, where did you come up with the idea? when did it occur to you that this might be a fun thing to do? >> i don't know when it decided to turn the novel. i remember when i was back in college, chatting with one of my professors after class one day, about what if lincoln had survived over the years a lot of peopl
states in 1862. is the second year the civil war and specifically reactions of president abraham lincoln. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> the thank you very much. a wonderful crowd. thank you to regnery books, a real asset to our community here. with all these programs. i am glad to see my kids in the audience, who asked me to mention their names. henry, alice, abby, claire and my wife karen is here and my mother doris and many friends but also the basis as well. thank you all for coming out. i appreciate your time and interest. in "rise to greatness" i tell the story of the most eventful and perilous time in american history, 1862. as much as possible i tell it through the eyes of the man who guided the nation through the fire, abraham lincoln. i don't want to spoil the book for you, so let me just say that the year began with the american republic in grave danger. the union army was struggling to regrow virtually overnight from a few thousand men scattered across the continent, to more than half a billion. the inexperienced officers, the command of these were all volunteers w
in this war are abraham lincoln, who makes his first major political speech, one that i found it was quite widely documented and discussed in newspapers. his first major speech in congress is about condemning the war. his first political stand is against the u.s. and mexico war. another person i talk about is john hardin, who some of you may be familiar with. he was part of a very important family in jacksonville. for a period of time, he was the leading whig politician in the state of illinois. not abraham lincoln. he was really under the shadow of john hardin before that happened. they are deeply affected by the u.s. and mexico war. now, let me tell you about the war. like most people come you probably don't know a lot about it. the north american invasion again with president james fulk. he sent troops into this area with the intention of starting a war. polk wanted more. polk actually went to his cabinet and said, i think we should declare war against mexico. and they said we really can't do that because the mexicans haven't done anything. we have sent 4000 american troops down so we c
in the rewrite, why abraham lincoln spoils the never raised taxes argument for republicans. that's coming up >>> what hillary clinton said tonight about running for president. >>> later, we will have a very special update about the kind fund. zeebox would be some sort of fancy, french mustard. just like adding fancy mustard to a hotdog makes you go "woah!," zeebox adds video, info, and playalongs to spice up your favorite shows. download zeebox free and say "woah" every time you watch tv. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or vi
, the tea party. later in the rewrite, why abraham lincoln spoils the never raised taxes argument for republicans. that's coming up >>> what hillary clinton said tonight about running for president. >>> later, we will have a very special update about the kind fund. >>> there aren't any taxes in if your tv were a space captain, zeebox would be an alien, first officer. just like an officer helps a captain explore the universe, zeebox helps you discover what shows are most popular, where the biggest buzz is, or what the stars are watching now. download zeebox free, and let your tv go where it's never gone before. download zeebox free, sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than antelope with night-vision goggles. nice! g
. president obama abraham lincoln's order that declared slaves in this country forever free. the document is once again on display. ron mott has details. >> reporter: showing its age the emancipation proclamation still draws attention. a document whose aim was to you night a country divided by war. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today the frail order consigned to history on january 1st, 1863 by abraham lincoln is again on public display. show% time just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris goodwin on president lincoln freeing the slaves. >> philosophically lincoln always believed slavery was wrong. there's no question about that from the time he was a young man. the question is what power did he, once he became president, have to do something about ending slavery? he finally found that door with his powers as commander-in-chief and with military necessity and then he went through that door. >> reporter: the proclamation and the union admitting blacks to its fighting ranks h
states with michael kazin. >> tonight i am going to us discuss abraham lincoln's role in the crisis of the union, 1860-61. more specifically will talk about however him again rejected any meaningful compromise. the country was gripped by a section of crisis because many southerners feared lincoln and his republican party. it was a north party and proudly so. it did not have a significant seven connection. lincoln was elected without a single lessor although for many of the 15 / states and only four of the border states did he get any popular votes and then nearly a handful. for the first time in the nation's history there will be taking over the executive branch of the national government. the republican party was proudly in northern party, during its brief existence in the mid 1850's damage its rhetoric and assault of the south, and the south major social institution racial slavery. and their determination that is the republicans' determination to well the north into a unit that could win a national election without any southern support, the republicans repeatedly condemned the sou
will be layman and then we will get to see abraham lincoln. and people who can put you in that moment and together the aggregate of that is the ken burns effect. there are so many people that work with me, great producers. the idea is to will that past alive, to wake the dead and to find in the past not some homework set of lessons but to find resonance with today. >>> we will take a quick break here and be right back. >>> and we're back with more from ken burns on his new pbs film, "the dust bowl." let me end on a very passionate subject and that is baseball. so here i am i grew up in los angeles a dodgers fan. i love the washington nationals and my kids do. i have a 10-year-old son and 7-year-old twins and i remember the first time i saw the dodgers win the pennant. i remember the beer flying through the air which is such a wonderful memory. if only that could happen for the nationals with my kids. i was at the game. the universe just isn't right. >> all of us became national fans. we were so excited. this is an incredibly excited team. everything seemed to be going right and then y
the emancipation proclamation still draws attention. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today the frail order consigned to history on january 1st, 1863 by abraham lincoln is again on public display. showtime just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris goodwin on president lincoln freeing the slaves. >> philosophically lincoln always believed slavery was wrong. the question is what power did he, once he became president, have to do something about ending slavery? he finally found that door with his powers as commander-in-chief and with military necessity and then he went through that door. >> reporter: the proclamation taken none admitting blacks to its fighting ranks helped tip the balance of the war towards the north weakening confederate forces and preserving the united states of america. many slaves of course went to their deaths never experiencing the freedoms espoused in the emancipation proclamation. some are buried here in the african-american national monument. as a maj
1865. this is abraham lincoln's second inauguration. a very famous speech they're in which he said with malice toward none and charity for all. 1933 franklin d. roosevelt, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. john f. kennedy in 1961, ask not what your country can do for you, as good you can do for your country. then the departure of the old presidents. here is george w. bush departing the scene on the back of the capitol four years ago flying off a helicopter looking back at the capitol. and as a luncheon. obama's luncheon for years ago. then the return to the white house after that. this is the first time that i first lady ever drove back to the white house with the president's. 1909. taft. we will see that again. the kennedys. the obama's what part of the distance. jimmy carter and rosalynn carter walked the entire distance of a mile and half in 1977 from the capitol back to the white house. the inaugural parade that will take place, reviewing stand is always set up in the white house. that is grover cleveland back in '85. there is the white house in the background. a c
to be here at the abraham lincoln presidential center. i have seen the benito juarez exhibit, which i encourage all of you to go see. a very big event. it is it fantastic show and really the relationship is so intriguing. one of want to talk to you about today's my most recent book in the invasion of mexico. the title is taken from my "from ulysses s. grant. from where it is live he looked back on everything that he had done in his career and in his memoirs he writes frankly about the experiences he has had the good and bad. it makes for really good reading, but one thing the crack spent some time thinking and talking about late in life was his role in the u.s.-mexico border of 1846. grant said at the time i do not think there was ever more wicked were then that waged by the united states of mexico. i thought so at the time when i was the dexter, only i had not moral courage enough to resign. during the time of the u.s.-mexico war, i just found this are really moving "which is why it took it for my title. the fact of the matter is grant was not alone in thinking that the u.s. invasion
? that is the subject of this evening's talking points memo. in the middle of the civil war, president abraham lincoln still took time to right wrongs brought to his attention. regular folks could go to the white house and hand petitions to the president's staff. mr. lincoln would then read some of them, turn the letters over and write comments that might help individual americans. abraham lincoln did that every week. now we have a situation where a former marine, 27-year-old john hammar has been in a mexican prison since last august for absolutely nothing. nothing. as we have reported, corporal hammar secured permission from the u.s. customs office in brownsville, texas to carry an antique rifle handed down by his grandfather across the border. he then checked in with the mexican officials with the paper work. the gun was clearly a recreational weapon that hammar wanted to take to costa rica on a trip. authorities arrested hammar, threw him in prison and actually chained him to his bunk. with six days to go before christmas, that's where hammar remains in a filthy, corrupt, mexican jail. corporal ham
to this, john. >> and always remember, abraham lincoln only serve one term in congress, too. >> dually noted. >> when you think alan west, do you think abraham lincoln or are we to infer he's thinking of running in 2016? >> good grief. he is no more like abraham lincoln as he was like harriet tubman. remember that classic historical figure he compared himself to? this is a man who has always viewed himself a lot more grandly than he really is, and it's a good thing that the people of his district voted him out so maybe now we won't be subjected to who he might compare himself to a couple weeks from now. >> ana marie, do you share jonathan's view or do you accept there's great similarities between the great alan west and abraham lincoln. >> they walk upright. >> this is true. >> i'm thinking. i'm thinking. >> two arms, two legs. >> they're both men. >> both men. >> yes, they're both men. i mean, they both served in congress. >> four. >> i mean, i guess that's true. but also, you know, abraham lincoln i think decided on his own not to run again for congress. so there is a little bit of a
in their families and people i talk about in this war are abraham lincoln, who makes his first major political speech, a speech i found quite widely documented and discussed in newspapers. his first major speech in congress is about the u.s.-mexico war. so lincoln's first political stance on the national age is against the u.s.-mexico war. that's one person i talk about. another person i talk about is john jay hardin, some of you may be familiar with. he was part of an important family jacksonville and for a period of time as the leading whig politician in the state of illinois. not abraham lincoln. hence cast in the u.s.-mexico war some argue makes his path forward and wrote to the possible because he was under the shadow of john harden before that happened. her insanely assassinating and it deeply affected by the u.s. civil war. and they tell you a little bit about the war because they assumed like most people you don't know a whole lot about it. the north american invasion as it is known in mexico began when president james k. polk sent troops into a disputed area between the new bases and
this and argue about it. i can see, okay, if it wasn't abraham lincoln who was likely to become president in 1860. i can get an answer. it almost certainly would have been william henry who was the secretary of state. that's great. i can go back and look at the memo he wrote to lincoln about what he wanted to do and what lincoln wanted to do and what was cone. i can get a good proxy for what might have happened if the ore would have gotten the job. measure what the impact of lincoln was. if you're thinking about individual impact, i don't think it makes any sents to say the person was here about decision was made therefore it's about them. if anybody would have made that same decision, it's not about them. japan attacks pearl harbor on december 7, 1941, franklin roosevelts has to decide if we are going to declare war on japan. we were going. >> no conceivable american politician would have declared war. >> no politician who would have become president. that's right. >> host: you pay particular attention to three presidents, thomas jefferson, abraham lincoln, you already mentioned and woodrow wils
betty was a democrat. you could not vote for abraham lincoln. perhaps in virginia. and during the of war some were profoundly opposed on good grounds the davises ministrations was the most centralized federal a concentrated power in the entire american history. one looked at the union government and the structure of the state's and the confederacy and said that was the lead by a fine state. the united states never had a government that big until the new deal. fin day had to build this enormous central state. think of that. they passed taxes within a year. and agents of the federal government literally taking food out of people's barnes. the only way to feed the army. that is fascinating that the slaveholders go to war to protect slavery than they think the new government will protect their slaves during war but it turns out they needs to use them to win the war. added it is an enormous tussle the also wrote a clause in the constitution that congress could never abolish slavery. they had a problem of sovereignty. they could not reach the slaves. they cannot reach them without the permissi
learn from abraham lincoln? >> one of the things that you learn having now been in this office for four years is, you know, the old adage of abraham lincoln's, that with public opinion there's nothing you can't do, and without public opinion, there's very little you can get done in this town. atchee worked for us. we don't argue much. we really don't. meg usually just gets her way, and i go along with it. i think it worked for matt because i did it for him. when i'm the one cooking, i'm the one calculating the points. i can microwave things. you get to eat real food. we still get to go out. we're just so much smarter about it. we can keep each other in check. going, "okay, i see you." we've lost about 110 pounds together. it helped our love life. happy wife, happy life, right? right. [ jennifer ] weight watchers online. the power of weight watchers completely online. join for free today. the red cross was down here all the time. [ man ] they've given us a lot of heart. in times of need, they're there. ♪ [ kerry ] my dad was watching his house burn. he turned around, and all of a sudde
citizens her father supported abraham lincoln. they were spiritual and were quakers within new england values of thrift to the point* of stinginess with her father and simplicity and plain living. to the quakers wealth was a sign of virtue and god's blessing so they were very blessed but her father really wanted a son. the first child was a girl. it was hetty. he became enraged and was furious. so much that her mother took to her bet. before she was two years old she was sent to live with her grandfather and her spinster aunt. she really wanted her father's love and do the only way to gain it was to earn it. because her father was an obsessed with money and he said so himself. her grandfather taught her to read the newspapers and the stock and bond places when she was a little girl. at the age of eight she opened her own account at a savings bank in town then sent off to the quaker boarding school taught about thrift, eat whatever is put before you, even if much and then if she did not she would be served it and tell it was all gone. and to respect for the poor girl's as their tuition
of this country's most important documents, the emancipation proclamation, president abraham lincoln's order that declared slaves in this country forever free. the document is once again on display. and nbc's ron mott has more. >> reporter: though clearly showing its age, fading ink, a yellow patina, the emancipation proclamation still draws undivided attention 150 years later, a document whose aim was to unite a country divided by war. >> it's amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> reporter: today at the national archives in washington you can the frail order consigned to history on january 1, 1863, by president abraham linkson again on public display. showtime, just a few days every year. >> very uplifting experience. it is a very important document. >> reporter: presidential historian doris kerns good win on president lincoln freeing the slaves in the rebel states to fight for their own freedom. >> philosophically i lincoln had always believed that slavery was wrong. there's no question about that, from the time he was a young man. the question was what power did he, once he becam
to the trusted performance of olay. >> lincoln. >> you never know, this might be the ticket. abraham lincoln had a historic task of bringing a divided nation together. and i hope lincoln can do it again. really? you see, tonight a divided senate will come together for a screening of steven spielberg's film. spielberg a fabulous producer and director. senators and their spouses will be joined by spielberg, actor daniel day lewis, screenwriter tony kushner and doris kerns goodwin. senate majority leader harry reid and mitch mcconnell wrote this. the film depicts the good which is attained when public servants put the betterment of the country ahead of short-term political interests. we believe that viewing this film would provide all senators with a positive opportunity to gather and reflect during the holiday season. the movie's themes should hit pretty close to home, don't you think, for senators still struggling to find common ground on the brink of this fiscal cliff we're talking about. bitter partisan divide, gridlock. the clock is ticking. but lincoln offers us a powerful message about d
, we take an encore look at president abraham lincoln and his evolving legacy in politics and culture. earlier this year, hari sreenivasan toured the ford's theatre center for education and leadership in washington, d.c., with historian richard norton smith. >> sreenivasan: walking into the theater center is like tang a step back in time to the cobblestone streets of washington on april 16, 1855, the day after president abraham lincoln's death. newspaper headlines cover the walls of the new exhibit which ...in a building across the street from ford's theater where the president was assassinated. >> you walk to the third floor and you come to this mothy attic. the chronological treatment. >> reporter: presidential historian richard norton smith, who helped design the center, says its mission is to examine how lincoln has influenced americans great and small since his death. in part, that influence is symbolized by the 34-foot-high book tower that connects the center's three floors. it's made of aluminum and represents some of the roughly 15,000 works written about lincoln. >> the story
douglas brinkley on barack obama, abraham lincoln, and spider-man. good to have you with us tonight, folks. thanks for watching. the president gave all americans a lot to work with today and a lot to think about in the coming weeks. president obama recognizes the mood of the country. there is a real sense of urgency to pass common sense safety laws in the wake of the newtown shooting massacre. the president knows this is going to be a heavy lift. >> that's why i've asked the vice president to lead an effort that includes members of my cabinet and outside organizations to come up with a set of concrete proposals no later than january, proposals that i then intend to push without delay. this is not some washington commission. this is not something where folks are going to be studying the issue for six months and publishing a report that gets read and then pushed aside. >> one of the reasons the president is asking for action without delay is because he knows change can be accomplished, and it's been done before. the assault weapons ban signed by president clinton reduced crime lower than it
war 150 years ago. president abraham lincoln had the vision to pull us together toward a shared goal of peace and prosperity. growing up in california i didn't know much about the arab world. then after graduating from the university of california at berkeley, i traveled to north africa as peace corps engineer. i worked as an english teacher in morocco two years and quickly grew to love this part of the world. since joining the service i spent almost my entire career in middle east and africa. one of the things that impressed me were people old enough to have lived and traveled in the united states when we had closer relations. those days are back. we had 1,700 libyans apply for fullbright grants to study in the united states this year, more than any other country in the world. we know that libya is still recovering from an intense period of conflict. there are many courageous libyans who bear the scars of that battle. we are happy we have been able to treat some of your war wounded at u.s. hospitals. we look forward to building partnerships between american and libyan hospitals to h
discourse from thomas jefferson to abraham lincoln and they provided for the military recruitment of people of african descent both of whom were slaves because of rich americans were not allowed to serve either in the united states army or the state militia because of the connection between military service and citizenship claims. oliver and the emancipation proclamation did not cover all of the slave states. it left out states that had remained loyal to the union and it left out areas of the confederate state that were under federal control. the tension between who is going to complete the eletes edition process lincoln for a while encouraged the border states to do it themselves even gradually and he was going to offer federal assistance. what's more is as important as the emancipation proclamation was, it was a war measure and this kids to the issue of the 13th amendment. what was going to happen once the war ended with the emancipation proclamation maintained its legal authority or what it effectively be overthrown by the courts, the 13th amendment came to secure the emancipation. but w
central to emancipationists' discourse from thomas jefferson to abraham lincoln, and they provided for the military recruitment of people of african dissent, both of whom were slaves and not slaves. this was also a break because african-americans were not allowed to serve either in the united states army or in the state militias because of the connection between military service and citizenship claims. on the other hand, the emancipation proclamation did not cover all of the slave states. it left out states that had remained loyal to the union. it left out areas of the confederate states that were under federal control. the tension between who's really going to complete the emancipation process. lincoln, for awhile, tried to encourage the border states to do it themselves, even gradually, and he was going to offer federal assistance. what's more is that as important as the emancipation proclamation was was it's a war measure. it gets to the issue of the 13th amendment. what happened once the war ended, what the emancipation proclamation retained its legal authority or educatively -
the abraham lincoln movie, the wheeling and dealing that had to be done? >> and it was done in a lame- duck session. >> in the good old days, some of us remember, you could punish people. i am taking away the bridge, you are not going to get that school or library. nobody wants to bring home the bacon anymore. >> let us remember -- >> the decrease in corruption has truly been harmful to the nation. you cannot get business done. >> let us remember that during the crash of 2007, 2008, in the end, it was the democrats under nancy pelosi who bailed out president bush. it was the republican secretary of the treasury who literally got down on his knees to hurt because he needed her to bring home the vote. she was able to do that. >> abolish bribery in the house and it grinds to a halt. >> see? ok. 26 people dead in a connecticut elementary school. what to do about guns. >> since friday morning, a police officer was gunned down in memphis, leaving four children without their mother. two officers were killed outside a grocery store in topeka. the woman was shot and killed inside of a las vegas casi
ago this week abraham lincoln issued the emancipation proclamation. today thousands lined up at the fat archives to see the original documents that freed the slaves. prot clamation is so fragile it's rarely seen in public. still ahead, a day of play on a frozen lake turns into a panicked rescue after a man falls through thin ice. >> finally ton a scary slip on a frozen lake in the mountains of southern california became a frantic effort to save a life. here's carter evans. >> it was a rare christmas experience in the mountains above los angeles. fresh snow and ice for people who rarely see it. so despite the warning signs. >> look at that big crack s that a big crack. >> few seemed concerned until -- >> we saw his arms flailing. someone said he can't swim. then it just turned into panic. >> michelle and mickey herman were there with a camera. >> at first all they could do was watch in horror as a man who rushed to help -- >> oh. >> fell through the ice, then another. >> six would-be rescuers in all were now in the icy waters. >> it was hard to watch, it really was. we saw tha
aimed at freeing slaves was signed by abraham lincoln 150 years ago this week. it went into effect january 1st, 1863. it will go on display at the national archives in washington, d.c. new year's day. in michigan last year people waited up to 8 hours to see it. >> when you see thousands of people waiting in line in the dark, in the cold, or the heat you know that they are not this just for words on paper. >> the document is double sided so only part of what is shown is authentic. pages 2 and 5 are ridge nalses, 3 and 4 are replicas. "game day" is next. good -- originals, 3 and 4 are replicas. "game day" is next ,, have a good night. here you go. you, too. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's paymen
. >> honorable mention, hollywood director and producer steven spielberg who brought abraham lincoln to the big screen. as he fights for the 13th amendment. the institution that outlawed slavery the film >>> okay. here it is. person of the year. pat buchanan. >> mohammed morsy of egypt. he goes from the muslim brotherhood to president of scrimmage to pharoah. he is winning the constitution. he is going to be a formidable power for a long time. >> the 14-year-old girl shot in the head by the taliban because she was an activist in wanting girls to go to school. molalla. she is on her way to recovery. we will hear more from her as she lives a good long life. >> the latino community whose political involvement won the election for obama. >> interesting. clarence? >> david axlerod with the obama campaign. >> the person of the year is federal reserve chairman ben bernanke. he and other like minded bankers have kept the world from skidding into a deep depression. to the friends and family of the sandy hook victims, our thoughts and prayers and are love are with you. next week tune in for the 2012 awar
," "total recall," "abraham lincoln: vampire hunter," "the watch," as i mentioned earlier, and "redtails." > > not a very good year for a lot of these films. warner brothers got picked up by "the dark night rises," obviously, but "cloud atlas" was a big disappointment, unfortunately - it's a very good movie. and then "rock of ages," a big summer flop for them - $75- million budget. "dark shadows," the johnny depp/tim burton film, also very high budgeted. > erik, overall, what do you think mattered most for ticketgoers? do you think it was the improvements in the economy, or just great movies that came out this year? > > i think it's just great movies. you look at "the avengers," you look at "dark knight rises," you look at "skyfall" - people are saying one of the best james bond movies ever. quality matters. people only seem to think hollywood can out a product and people will just show up, and that is the case sometimes. but when you get a movie that exceeds even its own epic status and through the market and all that kind of stuff, people just want to see it and it becomes an event, an
patroled easterrn afghanistan looking for improvised explosive devices, or i-e-d's. >> abraham lincoln may have died nearly 140 years ago but judging by attendance at historic sites around springfield his star shines as brightly as ever. state officials say visits to springfield area historic sites were of more than 3% in the first 11 months of the year. they are crediting the new lincoln movie as a factor. the actor who plays the 16th president in the film and visited several historic sites are robbed the state capital himself to prepare for his role >> laughe factory chicago stepped up tonight to help victims of hurricane sandy. the group arrange housing for several of the people left homeless by the east coast storm. factory members also held a comedy fundraiser to raise money for the new arrivals. the comedy club arranged housing for them at several campuses. the storm survivors will be able to stay until they are relocated to long term situations with area families or to homes owned by local churches >> a deal is on the table to prevent a huge spike in milk prices >> and later it i
by critics. fandango has the film at a dismal 23 out of 100. >>> abraham lincoln brought together a divided nation and it looks like he's going to try to do it again. the senate will be getting together for a screening of "lincoln" next week with steven spielberg on hand for a q and a afterwards. >>> betty white helped open grinchmas where she got the whomanitarian award. >> he looked decidedly well kept in his mug shot there. baldwin was booked on charges of tax evasion totaling nearly $350,000. >>> jed, justin bieber was snubbed by the grammys. his manager said his frustration. he said he deserved a nomination. is it the beginning of the end for the biebs? say it ain't so. he has so much life left in him. >> it seems immature to go at it with a tweet. >> that's the whole generational thing. it's like scooter is sort of edgy and young. he's going to take it to twit jer and say his peace. ryan seacrest with a big interview with him would have been another way to go. >>> this comes to us from nbc 5 in dallas, texas. in nearby fort worth a young boy was given the sleigh right of a lifetime. 5
of the original document. >> amazing to see abraham lincoln's signature. >> very uplifting experience. it's a very important document. >> the emancipation proclamation will be on display until tomorrow. it's only available for public view several days each year because of its fragile condition. >>> news 4 continues right now at 5:00 a.m. >>> running out of time to make a deal. where neglect smagss stand at this hour as we edge closer to going over the fiscal cliff. >> the dream season continues for redskins fans after the team's big win over the cowboys. has them playoff bound this morning. >>> can you believe that? >> going to be a happy new year for everyone. good morning, i'm richard jor n jordan, i'm erika gonzalez.
? could i drink it now? >> of course. tracy: i would love to. >> you open to the abraham lincoln bottle. [laughter] >> this was so vintage and powerful it last another 100 years. tracy: if i cannot get to manhattan how do i get it? >> online. tracy: amazing. he is delaying really well. head won online sale the day before as $60,000. wine lovers. as we wrap up the year but what is the biggest thing to keep your eye on? looking the other way at a shocking violence that the union rally. lou dobbs is here. tracy: spend a. spend. spend part of the model of the administration trillion dollar deficits the energy department announces $160 million plan to build more wind farms was bring in a senior fellow from the manhattan institute it is most laughable britain said the offshore wind farm is not produce amuch as three thought. it is not even a good idea we still spend money. >> it is agreed example to show the wind industry is the most favored in america wis subsidies and mandates hang getting subsidies under the national wildlife flawed no bearing more money at the offshore sector that would g
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